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Lumber Yard

I took this snap from the roof of the local Sawmill. There are hundreds of thousands of trees here - 50 trucks a day coming in with loads. This is only ONE mill - now tell me our natural resources are not totally FUBAR.

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by Django

submitted May 13th 2006

8 comments
what do you think? let everyone know!
Lumber Yard
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muchoworthytr_willk
not muchoworthysmerf
comments (8)
I pray some preservationist doesn't get a sight of this.
11 years ago
thing about this is that the amount of lumber cut from areas is regulated and how and where they're cut are as well. and the fact that once things are cut they are replanted with trees. so it may look bad, but it really isn't that bad
11 years ago
My friend used to log in Alaska. Do you really think they want to exhaust their way of income? Loggers are the true conservationists. <br>There are more forests now than any time since the 1800's. <br><br>They cut down the trees that are old growth which clears land and space for smaller, younger trees to grow to continue the process. <br>If you don't cut them they will choke out the younger trees leaving you with old, big trees which get diseased and die leaving nothing under them because for 50+ years they hogged all the sun, water and nutrients killing any younger trees below them.
11 years ago
our natural resources are not totally FUBAR.
11 years ago
PS- Loggers replant trees as well in areas of "old growth" trees that have been cut. (thanks Deja, I forgot that point)
11 years ago
"There are more forests now than any time since the 1800"
i dont believe it 1 bit
11 years ago
Believe it: http://biology.usgs.gov/s+t/noframe/m1103.htm#18043
11 years ago
This may help too: http://www.fia.fs.fed.us/library/briefings-summaries-overviews/docs/ForestFactsMetric.pdf
11 years ago
That's it--I'm curbing my toothpick habit starting NOW.
11 years ago
Enormous tracts of trees were destroyed by settlers in this country, without being replanted. Today, reforestation is a critical component of the U.S. lumber industry. Furthermore, with increasingly sophisticated measuring methods, the more sure we are about the rapidly increasing rate of forest growth in the continental United States. These are the current facts: In 1952, the U.S. had 664 million acres of forest land. In 1987 the number had climbed to 731 million acres, according to the most recent numbers available in the U.S. Statistical Abstract, 1993-1994 edition. "According to the U.S. Forest Service, annual timber growth in the U.S. now exceeds harvest by 37 percent. Annual growth has exceeded harvest every year since 1952. In 1992, just 384,000 acres -- six-tenths of 1 percent of the National Forest land open to harvesting -- were actually harvested. As a result of growth steadily exceeding harvests, the number of wooded acres in the U.S. has grown 20 percent in the past twenty years. The average annual wooded growth in the U.S. today is an amazing three times what it was in 1920. In Vermont, for example, the area covered by forests has increased from 35 percent a hundred years ago to about 76 percent today." <br>-- Joseph Bast, Peter Hill and Richard Rue, Eco-Sanity: A Common Sense Guide to Environmentalism (Madison Books: 1994), p. 23.
11 years ago
Ok Rob, I think you made your point :P
11 years ago
Sorry, I get all heated when this topic arises. I was a history teacher and was forced to learn about teaching the subject(s) as non-biased as possible. When there is such a clear slant typically AGAINST logging, I feel compelled to defend it or at least bring forth information proving the other side of the coin.
11 years ago
rob_in_nj - i get the same way about the whole asbestos bullshit cause i'm a geologist. things like the logging bit and my asbestos thing just piss me off :P
11 years ago
Then there are the rain forests... Different story there?
11 years ago
What asbestos bullshit? Is it non-toxic or something? Personally, I mix it in my coffee. Adds a nice, smooth taste.
11 years ago
I hope it was in reference to the US because I don't think Brazil goes anywhere near planting back the Kuwait-sized area of rainforest it cuts down every year (down from Belgium-sized a few years ago). Also it's nice to know that humans have to be there to preserve the forests, I mean imagine how good the forests would of had it if we came along a few million years earlier with clearfelling instead of letting nature regulate itself. I mean yeah those dead trees do nothing for the surrounding environment like replenishing the Earth with nutrients or providing homes for animals.
11 years ago
Cotb, what do you have against forests of dick-sized seedlings?
11 years ago
LOL@ TiredGuy about the toothpicks.
11 years ago
Obviously I asked whether the reference was in relation to the US before seeing the subsequent posts appear after I posted. I think I get your joke but I'm all for replanting that which has been taken down or better yet simply growing timber for the purposes of felling. Replanting isn't the same as the old-growth that was taken down even when you bother to plant the right trees or perform a contour rip.
11 years ago
Rob in NJ stfu.

http://www.ecoearth.info/talk/viewtopic.php?t=295&sid=a6df38a7d706ff2099a48f07584ff9e1

You're just plagiarizing.
11 years ago
^^^ are u serious? he even gave credit where credit was due.
11 years ago
A. How do you know I'm not Glen?<br><br>B. How do you know I didn't copy it from http://www.fair.org/index.php?page=1906 <br><br>C. STFU yourself douchbag. The truth is the truth.
11 years ago
Heh... got wood?
11 years ago
up-yours is a knob jockey
11 years ago
They're only a little
11 years ago
ssshhhh
11 years ago
youre right about lumber
but some of our natural resources are definately on their way to being fubar
like fossil fuel
and the oceans are getting quite bad
11 years ago
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